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Pharmacists in New Jersey Would Be Able to Dispense Certain Contraceptives Under Proposed Law.


Pharmacists in New Jersey would be able to dispense self-administered hormonal contraceptives pursuant to a standing order under a proposed New Jersey bill. Senate Bill 1073/2060 would require the New Jersey State Board of Pharmacy and Board of Medical Examiners to jointly develop procedures and protocols.
 
Under the proposed law, the standardized procedures and protocols would require a patient to use a self-screening tool to identify patient risk factors for the use of self-administered hormonal contraceptives, based on the current US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The standardized procedures and protocols would also require a pharmacist, upon furnishing a contraceptive to a patient or upon determining that a contraceptive is not recommended, to refer the patient to the patient’s primary care provider or to an appropriate and nearby medical clinic.
 
To date, the bill, sponsored by Senators Shirley K. Turner and Joseph F. Vitale, has been referred to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee.


Blog Empty Image

Pharmacists in New Jersey Would Be Able to Dispense Certain Contraceptives Under Proposed Law


Pharmacists in New Jersey would be able to dispense self-administered hormonal contraceptives pursuant to a standing order under a proposed New Jersey bill. Senate Bill 1073/2060 would require the New Jersey State Board of Pharmacy and Board of Medical Examiners to jointly develop procedures and protocols.
 
Under the proposed law, the standardized procedures and protocols would require a patient to use a self-screening tool to identify patient risk factors for the use of self-administered hormonal contraceptives, based on the current US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The standardized procedures and protocols would also require a pharmacist, upon furnishing a contraceptive to a patient or upon determining that a contraceptive is not recommended, to refer the patient to the patient’s primary care provider or to an appropriate and nearby medical clinic.
 
To date, the bill, sponsored by Senators Shirley K. Turner and Joseph F. Vitale, has been referred to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee.