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Which of the following statements is NOT TRUE about vaccines or immunizations?

a. Two live vaccines may be given at the same time.
b. parenteral or intranasal administration of a live vaccine is not thought to affect the immune response of a subsequently administered oral live vaccine.
c. A live vaccine and an inactivated vaccine can be administered without regard to the timing of the other.
d. Antipyretics/analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen should routinely be given prior to immunization to reduce the discomfort.


Which of the following statements is NOT TRUE about vaccines or immunizations?

a. Two live vaccines may be given at the same time.
b. parenteral or intranasal administration of a live vaccine is not thought to affect the immune response of a subsequently administered oral live vaccine.
c. A live vaccine and an inactivated vaccine can be administered without regard to the timing of the other.
d. Antipyretics/analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen should routinely be given prior to immunization to reduce the discomfort.

Answer:(d). If more than one non-oral live vaccine (e.g., live attenuated influenza vaccine [LAIV], varicella, mumps) needs to be administered, it is recommended that the vaccines be given on the same day. However, if this is not possible, doses of the live vaccines should be separated by at least four weeks. The four-week interval reduces the interference of immune response to the first vaccine by the second vaccine.
 
This rule for separation does not apply to the administration of oral live vaccines not given on the same day: typhoid and rotavirus. These vaccines can be given less than four weeks apart. However, this scenario isn't likely to occur because the age groups for which these vaccines are recommended do not overlap. In addition, parenteral or intranasal administration of a live vaccine is not thought to affect the immune response of a subsequently administered oral live vaccine.
 
A live vaccine and an inactivated vaccine can be administered without regard to the timing of the other.
 
Antipyretics/analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen should not routinely be given prior to immunization. They might reduce a patient's immune response. However, if needed, these meds can be used for treatment of fever and pain as needed following vaccination.

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