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Alaska Regulates Sale of Dextromethorphan Products to Adults, Requires Prescription for Persons Under 18 Years of Age.


The sale of products containing dextromethorphan in Alaska is restricted to individuals 18 years of age or older under a new law. House Bill 125 states products containing dextromethorphan may be sold if the person is under 18 years of age and has a prescription for the product from a licensed practitioner.

Alaska is the 11th state to restrict the sale of products containing dextromethorphan to adults and to require a prescription from a practitioner for individuals younger than 18 years, reports the American Pharmacists Association.


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Pharmacies in West Virginia Will Be Allowed to Dispense Opioid Antagonists Pursuant to Protocol Under New Law.


Pharmacies in West Virginia will be able to dispense naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal drug, pursuant to a protocol beginning June 10, 2016. Under the new law, a pharmacist or pharmacy intern is authorized to dispense an opioid antagonist pursuant to a protocol.
 
The law states the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy is required to develop a protocol requiring patient counseling, educational materials, and documentation of distribution in the West Virginia Controlled Substances Monitoring Program database. In addition, the Board is required to revise existing reporting requirements, provide limited liability to pharmacists and pharmacy interns, and reorganize existing code language.
 
West Virginia codes to be amended and reenacted include Chapter 16, Article 46, Section 3; Chapter 16, Article 46, Section 5; and Chapter 16, Article 46, Section 6. The law also adds a new section: Chapter 16, Article 46, Section 3a. Senate Bill 431 was signed into law by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin in March 2016 and takes effect June 10, 2016.


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Pharmacists in New Jersey Would Be Able to Dispense Certain Contraceptives Under Proposed Law.


Pharmacists in New Jersey would be able to dispense self-administered hormonal contraceptives pursuant to a standing order under a proposed New Jersey bill. Senate Bill 1073/2060 would require the New Jersey State Board of Pharmacy and Board of Medical Examiners to jointly develop procedures and protocols.
 
Under the proposed law, the standardized procedures and protocols would require a patient to use a self-screening tool to identify patient risk factors for the use of self-administered hormonal contraceptives, based on the current US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The standardized procedures and protocols would also require a pharmacist, upon furnishing a contraceptive to a patient or upon determining that a contraceptive is not recommended, to refer the patient to the patient’s primary care provider or to an appropriate and nearby medical clinic.
 
To date, the bill, sponsored by Senators Shirley K. Turner and Joseph F. Vitale, has been referred to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee.


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Pharmacists in New Jersey Would Be Able to Dispense Certain Contraceptives Under Proposed Law


Pharmacists in New Jersey would be able to dispense self-administered hormonal contraceptives pursuant to a standing order under a proposed New Jersey bill. Senate Bill 1073/2060 would require the New Jersey State Board of Pharmacy and Board of Medical Examiners to jointly develop procedures and protocols.
 
Under the proposed law, the standardized procedures and protocols would require a patient to use a self-screening tool to identify patient risk factors for the use of self-administered hormonal contraceptives, based on the current US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The standardized procedures and protocols would also require a pharmacist, upon furnishing a contraceptive to a patient or upon determining that a contraceptive is not recommended, to refer the patient to the patient’s primary care provider or to an appropriate and nearby medical clinic.
 
To date, the bill, sponsored by Senators Shirley K. Turner and Joseph F. Vitale, has been referred to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee.


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Naloxone Available in Some Pennsylvania Pharmacies Under Statewide Standing Order


Pennsylvania has among the highest rates of opioid-related abuse and overdose, according to this recent press release. In October 2015, Pennsylvania Physician General Rachel Levine, MD, signed astanding order that authorized pharmacists to dispense the overdose reversal drug naloxone to people who are at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose. Under the standing order, ACME Markets has made naloxone available at 10 ACME Markets pharmacies, a subsidiary of Albertsons, throughout Delaware County, PA.

Source: http://www.nabp.net/news/naloxone-available-in-some-pennsylvania-pharmacies-under-statewide-standing-order?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NabpNewsroom+%28NABP+Newsroom%29


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Maine to Require Providers Use E-Prescribing and Check Prescription Monitoring Data for Opioids, Benzodiazepine; Law Includes New Limits for Opioid Prescribing.


Maine to Require Providers Use E-Prescribing and Check Prescription Monitoring Data for Opioids, Benzodiazepine; Law Includes New Limits for Opioid Prescribing.

Prescribers and dispensers in Maine will be required to check prescription monitoring information when prescribing and dispensing a benzodiazepine or an opioid medication under “An Act To Prevent Opiate Abuse by Strengthening the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program” signed into law by Governor Paul LePage on April 19, 2016.

Under the law, a person who violates this rule commits a civil violation for which a $250 fine per incident may be adjudged.

Specifically, a dispenser must check prescription monitoring information prior to dispensing a benzodiazepine or an opioid medication to a person under any of the following circumstances:

a. the person is not a resident of Maine;
b. the prescription is from a prescriber with an address outside of Maine;
c. the person is paying cash when the person has prescription insurance on file; or
d. the person has not had a prescription for a benzodiazepine or an opioid medication in the previous 12-month period according to the pharmacy prescription record.
 
Further, the law (SP 671-LD 1646) establishes opioid medication prescribing limits. Prescribers may not prescribe to a patient any combination of opioid medication in an aggregate amount in excess of 100 morphine milligram equivalents of opioid medication per day.

In addition, prescribers may not prescribe within a seven-day period more than a seven-day supply of an opioid medication to a patient under treatment for acute pain, and prescribers may not prescribe within a 30-day period more than a 30-day supply of an opioid medication to a patient under treatment for chronic pain.

Prescribers will also need to complete three hours of continuing education every two years on the prescription of opioid medication as a condition of prescribing opioid medication. The law also requires all opioid medication to be prescribed electronically by July 1, 2017. Certain sections of the law are effective January 1, 2017.


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We have recently updated Naplex Questions and Answers Book. This new 2016-2017 edition covers an updated Naplex competency statement, and is available by clicking below link. You can also view sample pages associated with this book.

https://www.pharmacyexam.com/index.cfm/product/39_17/reference-guide-for-pharmacy-licensing-exam-questions-and-answers-naplex-2016-2017-edition.cfm

https://www.pharmacyexam.com/flipbooks/naplexqa/naplexqa.html


We have recently updated Naplex Questions and Answers Book. This new 2016-2017 edition covers an updated Naplex competency statement, and is available by clicking below link. You can also view sample pages associated with this book.

https://www.pharmacyexam.com/index.cfm/product/39_17/reference-guide-for-pharmacy-licensing-exam-questions-and-answers-naplex-2016-2017-edition.cfm

https://www.pharmacyexam.com/flipbooks/naplexqa/naplexqa.html


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Omega-3 Fish Oil Supplements Might Boost Antidepressants' Effects.


Omega-3 Fish Oil Supplements Might Boost Antidepressants' Effects.

Omega-3 fish oil supplements may improve the effectiveness of antidepressants, new research suggests.
Researchers reviewed the findings of eight clinical trials worldwide, as well as other evidence, and concluded that the supplements appear to help battle depression in people already on medication.

"Omega-3 fish oil -- in combination with antidepressants -- had a statistically significant effect over a placebo," said study leader Jerome Sarris. He is head of the ARCADIA Mental Health Research Group at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

The study looked at the result of trials where patients battling depression took either a standard antidepressant plus a form of omega-3 fish oil, versus the antidepressant plus an inactive placebo.

"The difference for patients taking both antidepressants and omega-3, compared to a placebo, was highly significant," Sarris said in a university news release. "This is an exciting finding because here we have a safe, evidence-based approach that could be considered a mainstream treatment," he explained.

Source: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158505.html


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Minnesota Pharmacies Could Take Back Prescription Medicines Under Proposed Legislation.


Minnesota Pharmacies Could Take Back Prescription Medicines Under Proposed Legislation.

Pharmacies in Minnesota would be able to collect and dispose of controlled substances (CS) and non-CS under a proposed bill (Senate File (SF) 1425). Currently, it is unlawful for Minnesota pharmacies to take back prescription drugs, reports American Pharmacists Association. The companion bill to SF 1425 is House File 1503. To date, the proposed bill was referred to the Committee on Health, Human Services and Housing for a second reading.